Health

Checking moles and staying safe in the sun

Checking moles and staying safe in the sun

As longer, brighter days promise sun-filled fun, it’s time for a reminder that sun exposure can cause our skin to burn and blister or even have effects that may be less noticeable in the moment but devastating in the long term: skin cancer. One in seven Canadians will have skin cancer in their lifetime, and the biggest risk factor is exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation.

Balancing limitations and loss with new identities and aspirations

Balancing limitations and loss with new identities and aspirations

Ardra Shephard doesn’t hold much back when she posts on her blog, Tripping on Air: My trip through life with MS. She writes candidly and often comically about her good and bad “MS days,” her hopes and frustrations, and her views on societal stereotypes about people with disabilities, including multiple sclerosis.

Workplaces are ideal places to promote mental health in Canada

Workplaces are ideal places to promote mental health in Canada

Imagine standing by a river and you see someone adrift in the current. You jump in and bring her to safety. Shortly after, another person appears in the water, struggling to stay afloat, then another. While it’s important to rescue these individuals, it is just as crucial to go upstream and investigate how they ended up in the water and prevent more people from falling in.

It helps to know you’re not alone

It helps to know you’re not alone

Gutsy kids make a stand for Crohn’s and colitis awareness and support

Imagine being asked why you missed school when the embarrassing truth is you had severe abdominal pain and needed to run to the bathroom to pass bloody diarrhea multiple times a day. This is often a sad reality for people living with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis when they experience a flare-up, says Mina Mawani, president and CEO of Crohn’s and Colitis Canada.

Understanding the factors affecting people with eczema

Understanding the factors affecting people with eczema

Eczema can come with a range of symptoms, from mild – such as the occasional dry, itchy or rough skin – to moderate or severe, with an intense itch and frequent inflammation and rashes. Yet no matter the severity of the condition, the persistent itch-scratch cycle that comes with a flare-up typically wreaks havoc with the quality of life of people with eczema and their families, says Aleyna Zarras, regional trainer and skin expert at La Roche-Posay. She believes that awareness about the factors contributing to such flare-ups can help to gain a measure of control.

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ESTATE PLANNING and WILLS Estate planning is essential for everyone

ESTATE PLANNING and WILLS Estate planning is essential for everyone

Half of all Canadians believe they are too young to worry about writing a will or don’t have enough assets to make it worthwhile, according to an Angus Reid Institute poll published earlier this year. That’s a mistake, says Sharon Hartung, an author and member of the Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners’ (STEP) Digital Assets Special Interest Group.

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BEATING THE ODDS Managing the risk of heart disease is critical for people with type 2 diabetes

BEATING THE ODDS  Managing the risk of heart disease is critical for people with type 2 diabetes

Dan Savoy couldn’t believe what the doctors in the emergency room were telling him – he was having a heart attack at just 26 years old. The medical staff was also shocked, and Mr. Savoy recalls their first reaction.

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Diabetes 360°: RECOMMENDATIONS TO ease the burden of diabetes on all Canadians

Diabetes 360°: RECOMMENDATIONS TO ease the  burden of diabetes on all Canadians

Research shows that individuals alone cannot address the diabetes epidemic. While there are many things those with or at risk of the disease can do to increase their chances of a long and healthy life, research proves that it is very difficult for them to succeed without the right environment, education and community-based support. “The fact that Canada is late to adopt a national strategy puts us in the lower third of developed countries,” says Kimberley Hanson, Diabetes Canada’s director of federal affairs. “We believe it’s time that changes.”

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Call for action to make an impact at the community level

Call for action to make an impact at the community level

Research shows that unhealthy weight is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes in youth, says Dr. Shazhan Amed, clinical associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics at BC Children’s Hospital and co-lead of a study, supported by the Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program, to track the disease, that was virtually non-existent in this country 25 years ago.

All ingredients must be organic

All ingredients must be organic

Ensuring organic integrity for organic meat products from farm to plate

Until very recently, organic meat was only really available in the refrigerated meat section of the grocery store. There’s a reason for that. Creating ready-to-eat products for the everyday shopper that include organic meat as an ingredient is more complex than you may think. For Yorkshire Valley Farms, a leading Canadian organic poultry producer, raising organic poultry and bringing it to market are as much a labour of love as a business enterprise. “A lot of people don’t understand the many layers and complexities of the organic system and all the things that need to be done to maintain its integrity,” says Krysten Cooper, director of Corporate Strategy and Sustainability. “The organic chain of command is meticulously managed at all steps.”

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Can the organic sector’s strengths advance national food policy goals?

Can the organic sector’s strengths advance national food policy goals?

Fall signals the beginning of the harvest season for farmers across Canada in a year that has been unpredictable and challenging for many producers and businesses in light of trade tariffs and tough NAFTA negotiations. Yet this fall also marks the beginning of a new chapter with the government’s forthcoming announcement of Canada’s first national food policy.

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Tackling common misconceptions to promote sun-safe behaviour

Tackling common misconceptions to promote sun-safe behaviour

Long and sunny summer days tend to promise opportunities for leisure and play. Yet when it comes to sun protection, people can be too relaxed. Many only pack the sunscreen on days when they’re heading to the beach. And once they have a tan, 60 per cent say they are not as diligent about sunscreen or forgo it entirely.   

Healthy Minds

Healthy Minds

Highlighting ‘what mental health really is’ during Mental Health Week

We often automatically say “fine” when someone at work asks how we are. Yet the same question can trigger a more meaningful exchange – one that acknowledges how we truly feel and whether we reach out when we need support. What are some of the conditions that are conducive to opening up at our place of work on days when we’re not feeling like ourselves?

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Looking ahead to affordable medicines for all Canadians

Looking ahead to affordable medicines for all Canadians

The Canadian life and health insurance industry welcomes the renewed focus on finding a way to ensure that all Canadians can get access to affordable prescription drugs. We strongly support the need for comprehensive reform so that Canadians can have access to medicines and, equally importantly, Canada’s prescription drug system is put back on a secure financial footing for the foreseeable future.

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Gastrointestinal Health

Gastrointestinal Health

‘Not just a bathroom disease’ – timely treatment and awareness improving outcomes for people with inflammatory bowel disease

As a flight attendant, Adam Polak was flying high with a job he loved when a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis brought him down. “I love everything about being a flight attendant,” he says.

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Aging

Aging

Older adults at risk of experiencing harm related to substance use

When a 24-year-old person walks into a doctor’s office appearing confused, agitated or tired, the physician will know something is amiss and will explore the potential that this person has consumed drugs. But there is a good chance that the same symptoms will not raise red flags for a 74-year-old patient. In addition, an older adult’s dwindling social circle can increase the risk of challenges related to substance use going unnoticed.

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