feature

Making reconciliation part of day-to-day life

Making reconciliation  part of day-to-day life

It has been over two years since the Truth and Reconciliation Commission issued its calls to action, but the journey to reconciliation requires perseverance and involves everyone, says Robert Joseph, hereditary chief of the Gwawaenuk First Nation and co-founder of Reconciliation Canada.

More information at reconciliationcanada.ca.

Vaccines

Vaccines

Don’t risk losing your quality of life to a vaccine-preventable disease

As children, about 95 per cent of today’s North American adults endured the itch and misery of chickenpox. And while we may not even remember being sick, we’re still harbouring its cause – the dormant varicella zoster virus – in nerve structures near the spine called the dorsal root ganglia.  

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Commitment to Reconciliation

Commitment to Reconciliation

Moving forward requires honesty about Canada’s collective past and present actions

As Canada enters its 151st year as a nation, the call for healing, reconciliation and justice rings loudly from coast to coast to coast, says Ry Moran, director of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR) at the University of Manitoba.  

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Reach across generational divide and “own your age” to help end ageism

At her installation as the chancellor of Sheridan College last year, renowned long-term former Mississauga mayor Hazel McCallion said, “I think 95 is a good age to start a new job.” And why not? In a time of octogenarian triathletes and nonagenarian marathoners, it’s worth asking why it’s still a surprise when an elder chooses an active, influential life.