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Supporting the shift to advanced bio-economy through partnerships, research and innovation

Supporting the shift to advanced bio-economy through partnerships, research and innovation

While Canadians have a healthy respect for forests, few might imagine the breadth of new and surprising applications of wood and its components, such as material for making clothes and lightweight plastic equivalents, material that is transparent or bullet-proof, or material for filtering and desalinating water.

Workplaces are ideal places to promote mental health in Canada

Workplaces are ideal places to promote mental health in Canada

Imagine standing by a river and you see someone adrift in the current. You jump in and bring her to safety. Shortly after, another person appears in the water, struggling to stay afloat, then another. While it’s important to rescue these individuals, it is just as crucial to go upstream and investigate how they ended up in the water and prevent more people from falling in.

It helps to know you’re not alone

It helps to know you’re not alone

Gutsy kids make a stand for Crohn’s and colitis awareness and support

Imagine being asked why you missed school when the embarrassing truth is you had severe abdominal pain and needed to run to the bathroom to pass bloody diarrhea multiple times a day. This is often a sad reality for people living with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis when they experience a flare-up, says Mina Mawani, president and CEO of Crohn’s and Colitis Canada.

Turning collective knowledge into impact

Turning collective knowledge into impact

How to embed sustainability in day-to-day operations and decision-making

There is consensus among leaders in business, government and academia that the time to take action on social and environmental challenges is now. “Social responsibility and environmental sustainability are not just topics of discussion, they are realities this and future generations have to address. That’s not a luxury anymore, it’s a necessity,” says Ali Dastmalchian, dean of the Beedie School of Business at Simon Fraser University (SFU).

A growing passion for tree planting

A growing passion for tree planting

CN efforts deepening community connections

When it comes to moving freight and passengers over long distances in an economical, energy-efficient and environmentally friendly manner, railway locomotives are the original green machines. “Rail is one of Canada’s climate-change solutions,” says Chantale Despres, sustainability director for Canadian National Railway (CN). A number of facts support this assertion. Rail is four times more fuel efficient at moving freight over the same distance than heavy trucks, reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by as much as 75 per cent. A single train can replace 300 trucks or more, reducing road congestion and promoting traffic safety. Trains can move a tonne of freight more than 200 kilometres on a single litre of fuel. Additionally, over the past 25 years, CN has further reduced GHG emissions from locomotives by 40 per cent, partly through the use of renewable fuels such as biodiesel.

Green economy jobs, investment choices

Green economy jobs, investment choices

Sustainability measures improving environmental performance plus business outcomes

TODAY IS EARTH DAY, THE WORLD’S LARGEST ENVIRONMENTAL EVENT and a fitting time to reflect on challenges and opportunities in Canada. While the average annual temperature in Canada has increased by 1.7 degrees Celsius from 1948 to 2016, about double the global rate, Canadian sustainability and clean technology leaders are advancing solutions that not only help curb greenhouse gas emissions and address climate change, but in the process are creating jobs and other economic benefits.

NATURE AND FREEDOM STRONGLY LINKED

NATURE AND FREEDOM STRONGLY LINKED

The word freedom has sparked countless revolutions across the world. It’s a word that resounds in our hearts; something that we constantly desire. Our innate yearning for freedom makes sense, since it has been shown to be an essential component of human health. In fact, people who feel “free” are less likely to die prematurely or even get sick!

A new home for innovation and discovery

A new home for innovation and discovery

Demonstrating its commitment to community and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) education, the University of Lethbridge (U of L) is giving innovation a new place to grow in Canada.

Connecting with community has always been a hallmark at U of L, and this outreach is set to rise to a whole new level with the September 2019 opening of the $280-million Science & Academic Building.

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Strong ESG focus helps financial services sector shine

Strong ESG focus helps financial services sector shine

Canada’s financial services sector isn’t just growing, it’s “doing good” – domestically and internationally. Experts say Canada’s global growth in the sector is due, in part, to its active engagement in key international initiatives on environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues.

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Cashing in on carbon

Cashing in on carbon

Cutting greenhouse gas emissions by reducing the amount of carbon dioxide that enters the atmosphere is a crucial step in efforts to mitigate the devastating impact of climate change, and while the costs of developing the technology to do so are high, the potential economic advantages may be even higher.    

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What we can learn from women leaders

What we can learn from  women leaders

The odds are stacked against them: women make up 45 per cent of the Canadian workforce in entry-level positions, but are 30 per cent less likely than their male counterparts to be promoted to the next level. Their chances for further advancement are even lower – women are 60 per cent less likely than men to make the leap from director to vice-president, says a 2017 Kinsey study.

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Developing capacity, strength and identity

Developing capacity, strength and identity

magine an intelligent building with interactive elements providing data about its net-zero environmental performance as well as insights into Indigenous knowledge. The First Nations Technical Institute (FNTI) envisions its future facility as an educational tool that uses sensors and apps for enhanced learning – while building on the success of existing programs that incorporate new technology. Language revitalization programs, for example, already draw on virtual reality elements, where students can explore a garden or a kitchen and listen to explanations in the Mohawk language about traditional methods for growing, harvesting and preparing food. Another language presentation in Anishinaabe takes viewers on a journey to harvest wild rice.

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